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Wow. I just came across this blog page as I was doing some research and it is inspiring. You are just awesome. I am a budding writer and I can honestly say you have made my passion leap to another level. I already subscribed to your pages, ready to learn from you. Thank you. Thank you.Reply to Joyce

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36 Beginner-Friendly Ways to Find Freelance Writing Jobs (2022)

1. Create a Writing Portfolio That Kicks Butt

Further Reading: How to Create a Writing Portfolio That’ll Wow Potential Clients walks you through everything you need to craft an online portfolio of your work, from portfolio sites like Contently to using your own blog. It also offers tips for building a list of writing samples if your portfolio is a bit sparse.

2. Supercharge Your Writing Skills

3. Ask for Testimonials

Most writers who do freelance work, either due to ignorance or fear, don’t ask for testimonials. Our own Jon Morrow says he’s only had a small handful of writers over the years ask him for a testimonial — even though he would’ve been perfectly happy to give one to them.

Karen offers everything I look for in a freelance writer: Her work is excellent, she finishes on time (if not ahead of schedule), and her attention to detail is wonderful. I enjoyed working with her so much that, as soon as her first article was completed, I asked her if she’d like to write for us again. I happily recommend her.

Note: You can count me among the poor, unfortunate souls who missed out on Jon’s generosity. Before becoming Smart Blogger’s Editor-in-Chief, I was a freelancer. I wrote five posts for Smart Blogger as a freelance writer, which means I passed on five opportunities for Jon to say nice things about me. Don’t repeat my mistakes — ask for testimonials at every opportunity.

4. Learn How to Craft a Killer Author Bio

5. Know How to Write a Pitch

6. Learn the Legal Side of Freelancing

The Definitive Guide to Freelance Contracts, Invoices, & Taxes

The legalities can seem so scary and daunting that many freelance writers choose to stick their heads in the sand and ignore them — or, worse, give up on their freelancing dreams rather than have to deal with any of it.

Freelance writing has given me a whole new life of living. I take my twins to school, am here when they get sick for weeks at a time and can participate in the reading program at their school every week.

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About The Author

Hi I’m Elna and I’m a freelance writer and mom blogger. I help people just like you become a profitable freelance writer. Within 6 months of starting my freelance writing business from scratch I was able to earn a full-time living as a part-time freelance writer while taking care of my twin toddlers. Check out my free email course Get Paid to Write Online and learn the steps you need to take to be a freelance writer.

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92 Comments

Hi Elna, I am so grateful to stumble across your content. This is Day 1 of researching my idea of becoming a freelance writer so I appreciate learning from your guidance so early in my journey. I’m signed up for the MasterClass and just downloaded your business plan. It’s a great start for today. A bit overwhelming, but satisfying to take my first steps. Thanks again. Respectfully, NikReply to Nikki

hello there Elna…first of all i would like to say i found ur freelance writing journey really inspiring cause since the past few months i’ve been at a loss regarding what i should plan on my future career based on my interests..[which is mainly reading novels and writing poems and other stuff lol] I am surprised why i didnt think of freelancing and content writing before so thank you very much! By the way i would like to know if contents related to psychology and mental health be eye catching for readers or shud i approach a more random topic? pls reply and thank you in advance Elna!Reply to ayisha

Hi Ayisha, That’s awesome you are now thinking of content writing and being a freelance writer. Regarding your question, there are lots of niches you can write about and be an authority too! I have a Booming Writing Niches Guide that tells you all those niches: https://elnacain.com/course/booming-writing-niches/Reply to Elna

Hi Elna.I appreciate for your great and inspiring information on how you started from humble background to become a powerful freelancer writer you are.Am 20 years and currently studying Diploma in ICT in college and have been having interest on reading novels and having greater hopes that l will start writing jobs but wondering how I will get started.ThanksReply to Pauline

Hello Elna thank you so very much for the insightful information you have given me. I’m looking forward to becoming a pro freelancer one day. I am however anxious and nervous a bit. I am at ground level and unsure how to start offReply to Peterson

Hi Peterson, Thank you so much! Taking the step into freelance writing doesn’t have to be hard, but I know it can be challenging with anxious feelings. Just take it one step at a time and you’ll be a great freelance writer 🙂Reply to Elna

Hi , actually I am a teenage girl who was looking for a way to earn money so I can help out my family. Then I found your website and your words inspired me and made me realize that I can become a writer or something like that. Actually.. um.. in the past I made short stories based on quotes and there was a time when I even tried to write a novel but failed to do so because I am bad at making long chapters or to say making something lengthy 😅 I don’t have the right words for this. In the first day my novel got a ton of views because of its description( What I am trying to say is that I can only write short stories) but all the readers left reading as I couldn’t meet their expectations in the long run.And the same thing happened when I tried to wrote a chat story in an app. Sigh!! I know I am asking for more but can I become a ghost writer or something in my current state. Please reply.Reply to Zohra

Hey Zohra, That’s create you wrote a short story! That’s a big accomplishment that other writers haven’t done yet. As for writing longer content, that will take time. When I first started I couldn’t write 3,000 word in-depth blog content. That took me a few years to practice. So start a blog and practice writing! You’ll discover your writing voice and from there you can start freelance writing!Reply to Elna

Hi I’m interested in becoming a freelance writer I don’t have a degree I just feel that I have as you say a niche for expressing myself kind like a pholosefer if that’s the correct wording for it Lol. I’m a Christian man so I would probably be sharing God’s word and my testimony and other ideas of courseReply to Carlos

Bonus #21: Use a Job Search Website

1. Are Freelance Writing Jobs Legit?

2. What Kinds of Freelance Writing Jobs are There?

3. What do Freelance Writing Jobs Pay?

4. Can Anyone do Freelance Writing?

5. Can You Make Money Freelance Writing?

6. How Does Freelance Writing Work?

7. Who Pays for Freelance Writing?

8. What are the Highest Paying Jobs For Someone Who Loves Writing?

For example, copywriting is a high-paying freelance writing job, but you have to learn the art of selling and write compelling, but also, conversational writing for businesses. Companies hire copywriters to write landing pages, email funnels, sales pages, brochures, press releases and more.

But, you can learn how to write specialized forms of writing and you know what? I can help you with that on my blog. Here are some beginner posts on how to write white papers, case studies, and press releases. All of these freelance writing jobs are high paying and can start at 800,000.

9. Do You Have to Have a Degree to Be a Freelance Writer?

10. How Much Should I Charge for a 500-Word Article?

Get Serious About Freelance Writing

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About The Author

Hi I’m Elna and I’m a freelance writer and mom blogger. I help people just like you become a profitable freelance writer. Within 6 months of starting my freelance writing business from scratch I was able to earn a full-time living as a part-time freelance writer while taking care of my twin toddlers. Check out my free email course Get Paid to Write Online and learn the steps you need to take to be a freelance writer.

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769 Comments

Wow, Elna! Your article was highly informative with a touch of inspiring! I’ve wanted to try to get in on freelance writing, but have never really committed to the pursuit. I’m going to try out your ideas, and find myself some extra income while honing my verbal skills to a fine point. If you see this, is there any extra advice you have?Reply to Justus

Hi Justus, Thank you for your compliment! That’s great you want to try freelance writing! It’s a great side gig or for when you work from home! I hope these tips can help you land your first freelance writing job!Reply to Elna

Hello Elna, Good day. I am so happy to stumble into this post. I am one of your students in Ready Set Traffic and I just learned about freelance writing a month ago as I stumbled into a local mom group in my country. I got excited and thought of giving it a try to earn some money, while slowly growing my blog. I got my first client, but she only wants 2 articles per month, and the payment is low per article (40$), but I accepted thinking that it can help build my portfolio. But after writing, I felt that it was not worth it because it took me a very long time to finish the article because I was reading a lot of resources and included a lot of resources, too. Where can I find jobs that pay a bit higher? I would like to enroll in your writing course, but I can’t afford it at the moment. Hopefully, in the future, I can finally enroll.Reply to Julai

Hi Julai! Oh, I hope you enjoyed Ready Set Blog for Traffic over on my Twins Mommy blog! As for your question, in the beginning you might have to do a little work to inch your way to higher paying clients. A lot of it depends on your client and your writing skills. Typically though, starter rates are around $.10-.12/word. My course is called Write Your Way to Your First 800k https://writeto1k.com 🙂Reply to Elna

Hi! Thank you so much for this post! I have a question for you if you don’t mind. I am a college student and I have terrible anxiety, so I have been trying to find a way to make a nice income from home. Do you know if any of these sites (referring to number 6 with guest posts) allow complete beginners to submit articles and accept them? Do you know of any sites that let complete beginners guest post, have a good acceptance ratio, and pay well? I would really like to do this and make a good income, if possible. Thank you so much and I look forward to hearing from you! -ConorReply to Conor

Hi Conor, Thanks for taking the time to read my post on 20 ways to find freelance writing jobs. In theory yes if the complete beginner has some social profiles and perhaps a Medium profile. Some guest sites want to know you have written online content before and will ask for some sample work. Medium is a fine platform to link to. They also may ask for you to link your social profiles too. But not all guest posting sites are like this! So do your research and try! The #6 option you are referring to is not a paid option. There are paid options for sure but the free ones are quicker to get your writing up and published and it can help build your portfolio as a brand new freelance writer.Reply to Elna

Elna, Thank you so much for your reply! I’ve been watching some of your YouTube videos and I found one talking about sites that post jobs. Is it common to find job postings on this site that are friendly to complete beginners? Do you think that is the best way for a brand new freelance writer to start making a good income quickly?Reply to Conor

Hey Conor, thank you Elna for a wonderful post it has been most helpful. I am starting out as a freelance writer hopefully, I was and still am very introverted sometimes. I thought that this made me want to be a writer, so I could survive in seclusion but I am starting to see that it is much more than that! I have no authority speaking on writing especially on how to make money doing it but there is something I would love to share Do not do a job just because of your anxiety, never let fear be the deciding factor for anything in your life! Please try and find a way to deal with this first, there are so many proven methods, have a deeper look at your own religion, study martial arts or even start an improv class Don’t let this control youReply to Shawn

Sources:

https://smartblogger.com/freelance-writing-jobs/
https://elnacain.com/blog/what-is-freelance-writing/
https://elnacain.com/blog/20-ways-find-freelance-writing-jobs/
Freelance writing

Offering full-time, freelance and remote jobs opportunities, JournalismJobs.com can help you find writing, editing, reporting or copy editor gigs. You can also find jobs across a wide range on industries like non-profit, technology and TV, so you’ll never get bored with this website’s selections.

Write great sample work

What is a Freelance Writer?

A freelance writer is a writer who works on a self-employed basis. They can work for just one magazine or, more often, they write for several different publications at a time. The more diverse a writer can be, the more likely they are to be published and paid for their work.

The Benefits
Being freelance does require a certain amount of self-reliance – there’s no regular, monthly salary, sick or holiday pay to fall back on – so it’s not for everyone. However, for any writer brave enough to become freelance the benefits are enormous. They:

How Much Does A Freelancer Writer Get Paid
Payment for freelance work varies greatly depending on what you are writing and who you are writing for. In general you will be paid for a piece of work you have produced – not on an hourly basis. As a very rough guide you can expect:

However, it’s worth bearing in mind that all published writing is valuable in its own right, as it can be added to a writer’s portfolio. The more high quality work a portfolio contains, the more impressed, and more likely to take your work, editors will be.

"I have seen my writing journey as an adventure: What can I write? What am I best at? What new aspects of writing can I discover and contribute towards? I have welcomed the wide range of modules covering different types of writing, challenging me to try new aspects in style and content, pushing me gently outside my comfort zone with encouragement.

"I signed up for the course in December 2020 as a Christmas present to myself and I started the first module in January 2021. I have had eight pieces published: three paid earning £1080 and a star letter where I won a £250 hotel voucher."

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So where should you look for online writing jobs?

1. Freelance Writers Den

A great resource for freelancers, this membership site is so much more than a job board. For $40/month, you get access to more than 300 hours of “bootcamps” that teach you how to make money as a freelance writer and hundreds of forums where you can get any question answered. Whether you want to listen to the expert guests on their podcast, access the 24/7 community of writers, or check out video and audio training materials, the Den has everything a freelancer needs to grow their career — all in one place. Plus, they have direct job referrals to quality writing gigs in the Den 2x program.

2. FlexJobs

One of the top job boards for freelance writing jobs and remote work, FlexJobs enables you to create a custom job search profile to meet your specific needs. Select your categories (there are several under “Writing”), your preferred work schedule, your experience level and more to hone down your search results to those that best fit the freelance writer job you’re looking for. You can also set alerts so you’re notified when new jobs matching your search criteria are posted.

3. SolidGigs

SolidGigs is part job board, part productivity tool. Why? Because their team literally saves you hours of scouring job boards. They hand-pick the best gigs from around the web and compile them into a weekly email, including remote opportunities.

4. Opportunities of the Week

Sonia Weiser’s bi-weekly newsletter has become a must-have for freelance writers. She gathers dozens of calls for pitches from Twitter and emails them to her community twice a week. She offers the service through Patreon, where she asks for a membership contribution of up to $10 (and also offers sponsorships for those who can’t afford it). If you can only make a one-time contribution, she provides an option for that, too.

5. Working In Content

A platform that’s still in its beta phase, Working In Content aims to connect organizations with passionate content professionals. As a bonus, it values diversity, equity and inclusion, and it encourages the employers it works with to do the same.

Whether you’re a UX writer or a content strategist, this site is a great option to find work in content design, marketing, management and more. It offers full-time and contract roles that are either remote or in cities like Seattle, New York City and San Francisco.

6. ProBlogger Job Board

Created by Darren Rowse of ProBlogger, an authority site on blogging, the ProBlogger job board features part- and full-time, contract and freelance writer jobs across a wide variety of locations, industries and writing specialties.

Plus, given ProBlogger’s high profile in the blogosphere, it’s likely you can often find jobs posted by some big-time blogs and employers who have an idea what good writing is really worth. Besides content writing, it also lists a healthy dose of copywriting jobs.

7. Content Writing Jobs

This site content writing job board includes remote, freelance, contract and full-time jobs. To peruse these hand-picked writing opportunities, visit the site online, sign up for daily job alerts or subscribe to its paid newsletter that shares brand new openings once per week for $10/month.

8. Behance Creative Jobs

Behance allows you to upload your past projects to quickly create a visually-pleasing online portfolio, making it a great resource for writers without a website . It has its own job board which you can browse to find your next career move or freelance writing job!

freelance writing jobs

9. MediaBistro

Be sure to check out the freelance job board section of the site, as well, for a wide range of jobs for all experience levels from industries like TV, PR/marketing, magazine and book publishing and social media — a little something for everyone.

10. Morning Coffee Newsletter

With exclusive job opportunities as well as posts pulled from sites like Indeed and Craigslist, the job board consolidates a variety of gigs for everyone from newbie to seasoned freelancers. Save yourself the time of scouring numerous sites and let this newsletter bring the decent jobs right to your inbox.

11. Who Pays Writers?

Who Pays Writers? is a crowd-sourced list of publications that pay freelance writers — and it’s a gold mine. The list has hundreds of publications to explore; it not only shows you which publications are accepting submissions, it also tells you how much they pay per word.

Three tips for making more money as a freelance writer

Like any new business, it’ll take time to grow your freelance writing career and develop the connections you need to start earning money. However, once you’re up and running it can be a great second income — or a full time job if you’d like it to be.

The right goals for you will depend on whether you’re writing for fun, as a second stream of income to supplement your full time job, or as a future career. However, having some goals set out in writing is the best way to make sure you stay on the track that works for you. Your goals might be to write a certain number of pieces per week, to get published in a particular magazine, or to earn a fixed monthly amount, for example.

Working freelance means you’re in charge of your own time. This is an amazing perk — but also can mean that you spend longer than you realize on some pieces of work, or that you blur the lines between work time and leisure time. Tracking how you spend your time is the best way to make sure you’re charging the right amount for your work, and can help you see ways to earn more by focusing on the writing which pays best per hour.

1. Avoid content mills

Content mills offer work to freelance writers, often writing blogs and content marketing materials. However, they often offer low rates to writers, and keep a large amount of the profit from the writing for themselves. In most cases it’s better to avoid these companies if possible. Instead, create your own online presence with a blog or website, network with businesses in your niche, and pitch directly for paid writing opportunities. This may take a little longer than getting a fast fee from a content mill, but it’ll very quickly turn out more profitable.

2. Develop new business as you go

If you’re writing to earn an income you’ll need to continually pitch to new clients to win more work. A good way to do this is to set aside a fixed amount of time every week or month, to seek out new leads, build your network, pitch clients and develop new business ideas. Treat this as a crucial part of your working week, to make sure you have a continued pipeline of work on an ongoing basis.

When you first start writing you might choose to charge a relatively low fee for your work as you build your skills and your portfolio. However, you should review your prices and increase them over time, to make sure you continue to grow your business. Ask friends in the same niche, or use your online network, to get a sense for the market rates they charge, and to make sure you’re pitching at the right level.

Grow a global client base

3. Grow a global client base

Starting to look in English speaking countries is the easiest option – try the UK, Australia, Ireland or New Zealand. However, it’s common for companies in Europe and beyond to need English language blogs, website copy and more — so it can also pay to reach out to customers based in countries where English isn’t the first language, too.

By getting a smart multi-currency account like the Wise borderless account, you can invoice clients in their home currency so it’s easy for them to pay you quickly, making working with an international customer no different to working with one here in the US. You can also create and send your invoices by using our downloadable free invoice templates, and find an independent contractor agreement template to make your work official.

As you take on more clients you’ll get better at creating and chasing invoices, and managing your money as a freelance writer. If you’re working with clients based overseas it’s a smart idea to have an account which makes it easy to get paid in foreign currency, so you can invoice clients in their home currencies for ease.

Try the Wise borderless account to see how easy it is to receive payments in foreign currencies. With your own local bank details you can get paid in major currencies like British pounds, Australian and New Zealand dollars and euros, for no fee. You’ll even be able to hold dozens of different currencies in the same account, and switch between them when you want to using the mid market exchange rate. That means there are no hidden fees to worry about — just a small transparent charge to convert your money back to dollars.

How to be a great freelance writer

How to be a truly great freelance writer?

1. Research everything thoroughly

Just like with any other skill, it takes time to really get familiar with the ins and outs of freelance writing. Researching around the subject can help – read all you can about how to write great articles, copy and blog posts, what kind of jobs can you get as a freelancer, how to set your rates, and how to optimize your writing for search engines. You’ll also find a huge volume of helpful and enjoyable information out there about how to become a writer and excel in the career, from those who have already made the leap.

2. Get familiar with the skills and tools that are required

As you develop your client offering, ask what other services they may value. You’ll probably find you can also sell editing services, image sourcing or editing, and maybe SEO work or social media promotion. By educating yourself on these topics you could increase your income and serve your clients even better.

3. Become a master of organization

4. Always continue honing your writing craft

Even experienced freelance writers can get better. Continue to educate yourself and learn about the writing skills you need for the type of content you are working on. A key way to get continual professional development is to read other writers working in the same field. Follow industry magazines, sign up to blogs in the same niche as yours, and make use of social media to keep up to date by following fellow writers on Twitter, Medium and any other outlet you love.

If English isn’t your first language you can still make a career out of writing for English language publications based in your home country or in English speaking parts of the world. You’ll need to follow the same basic steps as a native speaker – and if you need some extra practice with your writing you can consider blogging or taking on lower paid work to build your portfolio.

5. Create an outstanding portfolio

Coming up with your portfolio is one of the first things you’ll do as an aspiring freelance writer — but your portfolio isn’t a static document, so you’ll need to update it and your pitch materials as your career and experience grow.

6. How to pitch for jobs

Pitching for work is intimidating when you’re first getting used to it. It’s well worth investing time in creating high quality targeted pitches for clients you’re interested in working work. Find prospective customers on freelance marketplace websites like UpWork, Problogger, Fiverr and Textbroker, or contact companies and sites you love directly.

“I’m a freelance writer and digital nomad, specialising in creating engaging copy about the products, services and tools which make life better as a traveller and remote worker. I’d love to discuss how I can help you grow your business with compelling blog posts and articles, and by generating energy in your social media channels”

7. Just do it

Getting started is always the most difficult thing about any new endeavour. Freelance writing is a great creative outlet, which can be fun as well as providing an income. And best of all you’ll need little to no monetary investment to get going. Get yourself a free blog or website, spend a bit of time daydreaming about your favourite topics to write about, and start writing. It’s really that simple.

This publication is provided for general information purposes only and is not intended to cover every aspect of the topics with which it deals. It is not intended to amount to advice on which you should rely. You must obtain professional or specialist advice before taking, or refraining from, any action on the basis of the content in this publication. The information in this publication does not constitute legal, tax or other professional advice from TransferWise Limited or its affiliates. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. We make no representations, warranties or guarantees, whether express or implied, that the content in the publication is accurate, complete or up to date.

Sources:

https://www.writersbureau.com/writing/what-is-a-freelance-writer.htm
https://thewritelife.com/find-freelance-writing-jobs/
https://wise.com/us/blog/how-to-start-freelance-writing
Freelance writing

So, for example, if you’re applying for a freelance writing opportunity with a fitness company, you’re going to want to send writing samples that showcase your work in the health, wellness, and fitness space—not an article you wrote for a tech company (even if that article is particularly well-written).

how do freelance writers find work

What is Freelance Writing? The Ultimate Guide

You’re not the only one. The definition of freelance writing can vary dramatically depending on who you’re talking to. Freelance writers can do tons of different jobs, find work differently, and work with different clients.

Freelance writing is the act of getting paid to write, without being on a company’s official payroll. Freelance writers can work with several companies at once on a self-employer or subcontractor basis.

    Per word: The writer and client agree on a set rate per word for an article. Freelance writers being hired to write blog posts, for example, usually start with a per-word rate of

    What does a freelance writer do?

Wondering what a freelance writer does in their day-to-day role? It depends on the type of content you’re writing. But as a general guide, here’s what a freelance writer does (alongside the obvious one–writing content):

You can choose who to work with

The beauty of freelancing is that you’re in complete control of who you do (and don’t) work with. It’s unlike a standard, 9-to-5 job where you’re forced to work for one employer, and you don’t get to choose your co-workers.

Whilst freelance writers don’t have co-workers as such, they’re in complete control of who they work with. They can choose to turn down clients who don’t have a budget to pay them, or they just aren’t interested in writing for. That’s not possible with a full-time job.

Your routine is flexible

Since a freelance writer is in complete control of who they work for, their routine is flexible. Clients don’t pay them to sit at their desk from 9am till 5pm, with half an hour for dinner, every day of the working week.

It’s why freelance writing is a superb career choice for tons of people–especially those who drop the kids off at school, and want to be able to attend midday appointments without that awkward conversation with your boss. (Let’s face it: having to explain to your boss why you need the morning off for a doctor’s appointment is awkward.)

You can make lots of money

We all want to earn more money, right? Article writing is a superb way to do that. The entire industry is very lucrative: get in with the ideal clients, and you can out-earn what you would in your day job by a long shot.

But it’s worth remembering that not all of the money you make as a freelance writer is take-home pay. You’ll need to fork out for expenses (like a computer), tax, and insurance. Either way, there’s still a good chance you can beat what you were earning in a full-time job by becoming a freelance writer.

.10. This can go as high as

The downsides of freelance writing

It takes time

Not only that, but it’s easy for new freelance writers to fall into the trap of thinking their new freelance writing job will only consist of writing. Reality is: you’ll spend time doing other admin tasks–like finding new work, creating a freelance website, and dealing with accounting. All of those things eat into your schedule, but you don’t get paid to do them.

It can be unpredictable

Even if you’re on top of your freelance writing career from day one, finding reliable work can be tough. It can be difficult to reach your audience as a freelancer, especially when you have a small marketing budget. And it doesn’t help that you’re up against freelance content mills like Upwork and Freelancer.com.

Similarly, freelancers can fall into the feast and famine mindset. If you’re working job-to-job without any contracts or monthly agreements in place, you don’t always know where your next paycheck is coming from.

disadvantages of freelance writing

.75+ for experienced, in-demand freelance writers.

Where to Find Freelance Writing Jobs: Agencies

SEO Agencies

For example, if you want to be a food writer, look for an SEO agency that partners with food and beverage brands. If you want to break into your local writing scene, look for a local SEO agency that partners with the best small businesses in town.

Content Marketing Agencies

Content marketing agencies create content that helps brands engage, educate, and connect with their audiences (think blog posts, ebooks and white papers). And, again—they need freelance writers to help bring that content to life.

Web Design Agencies

Digital Marketing Agencies

Digital marketing agencies help businesses increase their reach in the digital space and typically offer services like social media management, digital advertising, and email marketing—all of which require writers.

Ad Agencies

Ad agencies come up with creative advertising campaigns for brands across a number of verticals including print, digital and TV/video. They’re always looking for sharp, creative freelance writers to help come up with copy for their campaigns.

Content Mills

Content mills don’t have the best reputation. Basically, content mills offer content to their clients at a low price and then outsource the writing of that content to freelance writers. Because they’re charging a low rate to the client, they’re also paying a low rate to freelancers.

“A lot of naysayers are going to tell you to walk on by, but this maligned corner of the freelance world has a lot to offer if you know how to approach it correctly. Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the content mill, the P90X of freelancing.”

If you’re just starting out and are looking for a steady stream of work to build your portfolio, content mills can be a great solution. And if you’re a fast writer who can churn out a lot of words, you can actually earn a pretty decent living.

Tips for Finding Agencies to Partner With

recession ad

Becoming a freelance writer: Savannah’s story

becoming-a-freelance-writer-savannah-mireille-blog

“Like many people, I wasn’t too sure what to do with my life as a college student. Despite being an English Literature major, I ended up going down the path of becoming a digital marketer because it felt ‘safer,’ and I decided to pursue my love of writing in my free time by creating a lifestyle blog.

I had no idea how to be a freelance writer, though, so I turned to a friend who was already working as one and asked her for advice. She led me to a freelancing platform called Upwork and was kind enough to give me some tips and share her profile to reference.

Since then, I’ve continued to grow my own blog and have worked with multiple clients across industries, writing blog articles, social media posts, web pages, and much, much more. As of today, I’ve happily been a freelance writer for the past three and a half years.”

How to start freelance writing – your first 5 steps

1. Explore freelance writing job opportunities

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Upwork is one platform I often recommend getting started with. You’ll find a ton of writing opportunities there, making it an awesome place to get a feel for the freelance writing market and, of course, actually begin your career.

2. Create your freelance writing site profile

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Your photo

Your title

Your overview

So, rather than talking a lot about yourself, where you like to go on holiday, and your cat, Greg, tailor your profile overview to focus on clients’ needs, positioning yourself as the solution to their problems.

Describe the client
Describe their pains
Describe the gains they want
Position yourself as the solution
Provide validation (testimonials and results)
End with a call to action (CTA)

So, an example of a CTA might look like, “contact me today” or “get more conversions now;” however, there are several ways you can play around with it to showcase your unique personality and stand out (like Alex does).

3. Make your freelance writing portfolio… while you apply for writing jobs

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Basically, instead of wasting your time coming up with random ideas, like “101 Ways to do Underwater Basket Weaving” that might not be relevant to anyone, you’ll create an effective writing sample that aligns with what a client is looking for in their listing.

And the best part of the MVP method is, all you have to do is spend half an hour or so writing just one highly efficient 200-400 word sample, as opposed to spending days or even weeks writing several long portfolio samples that could potentially lack any significant appeal.

4. Take a freelance writing course or two to hone your skills

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Freelance Article Writing: Start a Freelance Writing Career!

If you want to learn more about article writing, this is a valuable course to learn how to become a profitable freelance article writer. It includes hands-on advice on how to write and structure your articles, mistakes to avoid, how to secure the best-paying writing jobs, and much more.

Freelance Copywriting: Write Dirty. Go Big. Start Now!

For newbie copywriters, take this course to discover which steps you need to take to make money copywriting, tactics to grow quickly, the four types of copywriting you need to know, amateur mistakes to avoid, and other helpful tools.

Grant Writing for Nonprofits and Freelance Writers

Sources:

https://peakfreelance.com/blog/what-is-freelance-writing/
https://www.freshbooks.com/blog/where-to-find-freelance-writing-jobs
https://freelancing.school/how-to-become-a-freelance-writer/

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